Write your name in Quenya Elvish (accurately)

22 thoughts on “Write your name in Quenya Elvish (accurately)”

      1. My condolences. The guide should provide a very direct method of transcription for Nacho. Keep in mind, however, that the sound ‘ch’, as we pronounce it, does not exist in Tengwar. The closest variation would be the aerated ‘ch’ as in the Scottish ‘loch.’ You have a couple options here:
        1. Determine the phonetic orthography of your name and transcribe accordingly (see the handbook reference at the beginning of this article);
        2. You can brute force stick with a character substitution (such as replacing the ch with the aerated ‘ch’ and using harma, or a different substitution thereabouts). You’d change the pronounciation of the name to fit the Quenya dialect.
        Hope this helps.

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  1. Hi there! I think I have the names written correctly, but I just want to double check. My parents are getting a tattoo each of our names in Elvish, so it’s vital that the translation is correct. We’ve used https://www.jenshansen.com/pages/online-english-to-elvish-engraving-translator which seems pretty legit, but when I entered Rachel (one of your examples) it came up with different tehtar and a different middle symbol. Would you be able to provide any assistance?

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    1. Of course, Teddy. Are you looking to write the names in Quenya Tengwar (high Elvish script), Sindarin Tengwar (common Elvish script), or Black Speech Tengwar (an ancient mode of writing most commonly identified in its inscription on the One Ring)?

      This is the main difference between jenshanson.com and my site; I am writing in modern Quenya Tengwar, whereas Jens Hansen write in Black Speech Tengwar (which, at first glance, violates several interpolated rules of Black Speech Tengwar. i.e., it’s not to be trusted…)

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  2. Is there a way to show possessions such as the apostrophe. Like how in English one may say “The child’s toy” with the apostrophe indicating that the toy belongs to the child?

    Also the same goes for contractions (but those can easily be avoided)

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  3. Also, how would you put down an ‘ed’ suffix as in ‘Pierced’ or ‘walked’ as it doesn’t appear that theirs a sound or symbol for the letter ‘d’

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  4. My daugther is named Anna for the Quenya word “anna” as in “gift”, and as far as I understand your guide, I would right the word “anna” by writing the short carrier with the tehtar a (3 dots) untop, and then the n with a line under, topped again with the tehtar a. Am I understanding this correctly?

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    1. Hi Justin, there is no tengwa associated with the sound ‘j’ as we understand it. You have the option here of determining the phonetic orthography of your name and transcripting accordingly (see the handbook reference at the beginning of this article); or you can brute force stick with a character substitution (such as replacing the j with a ‘ng’ and using anga, or a different substitution thereabouts). You’d change the pronounciation of your name to fit the Quenya dialect.

      Alternatively, you can come up with your own chosen Elvish name—a kilmessë—making sure to use only sounds represented by the tengwar and transcribe accordingly. Look here for more information:

      http://tolkiengateway.net/wiki/Ess%C3%AB#:~:text=Kilmess%C3%AB%3A%20a%20name%20chosen%20by,deeds%2C%20talents%20and%20personal%20history.

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  5. Hello! I am translating my name for a tattoo, and I want to make sure I have it right. My name is Rae, so would I use the r symbol followed by the ae diphthong or would I use the ‘a’ modifier and the placeholder for ‘e?’ (sorry if this doesn’t make sense). Thank you so much – this guide is really helpful!

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    1. Hi Rae,
      You have a few options here:
      1. Determine the phonetic orthography of Rae and transcribe accordingly (see the handbook reference at the beginning of this article). Rae would be an easy one to do with this method; it’s possible that a romen with an a tehtar atop it would suffice; or,
      2. Tolkien did develop a mode of Tengwar specifically for English, and I believe it includes a tehtar for a silent ‘e.’ If you would prefer to preserve the silent ‘e’ in your name, I refer you to the website mentioned at the top of this article. In this case, your name wouldn’t be written in the Quenya mode of Tengwar.
      3. You can brute force stick with a character substitution (just as you mentioned, place the ‘a’ atop the ‘r’ and use a short carrier on which to place the ‘e’). You’d change the pronounciation of your name to fit the Quenya dialect. I wouldn’t recommend this method, but it’s a possibility.
      It’s up to you. I’d be interested to know what you decide. Good luck, in any case!
      LM

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  6. Hi there. Doing a little research regarding a tattoo I’m considering. I appreciate your guide but English is not my first language, so I’m a little confused and I want to make sure that I get it right.
    As I understand it the Elvish word for Family is “noss” in Sindarin and “nosse” in Quenya (all singular).
    But I’m unsure as how to write “noss” and “nosse” in Tengwar.
    And what would it look like to just use the word “family” as an English mode?

    Could you be so kind and help me out?

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    1. Hi Sarah, good to hear from you.

      In order to avoid mixing up language classes, I encourage you to stick with “nossë” since the guidelines I’ve written above are for the Quenya mode of Tengwar. Here, you’ll write numen, on top of which you’ll write the character for the vowel “o.” Following that, you’ll put esse (of the “vowel above” variation), upon which you’ll place the character for the vowel “e.” This is how I would go about it.

      If you’d prefer the Sindarin mode (and thus “noss”), Thorsten Renk’s guide to Sindarin “Pedin Edhellen” is a reliable source to consult.

      To write just “family” in the English mode of Tengwar, consult the handbook on this website: https://www.tecendil.com/tengwar-handbook/.

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