Toys for philosophers: the many orderly dimensions of the tesseract

“Wanna see something cool?” is a question I ask quite frequently at mass social engagements now. It’s usually queried unsolicited of some hapless chap who made the mistake of letting the conversation dwindle to an awkward silence. Yes. This is how I interact with people. But the question is unnecessary and redundant for two reasons; … Continue reading Toys for philosophers: the many orderly dimensions of the tesseract

Défiler by Stromae: A commentary on upward mobility

Stromae, a world-famous Belgian musician, left the spotlight after the release of his second album in 2013 and has since remained dormant. But he emerged from his occupational slumber in April 2017 to release a single—”Défiler,” meaning “to parade.” The song is just under ten minutes long and comments on two primary themes: the movement … Continue reading Défiler by Stromae: A commentary on upward mobility

A star shines on the hour of our Elvish lesson: An introduction to Tolkien’s languages

Despite having been named for the legendary Elvish forest in the works of J.R.R Tolkien, my interests in silvology and arboriculture are inexcusably limited. It’s high (elven) time I write about what I know. What I lack in these realms of science I make up for in amateur linguistics. For almost six years now, I … Continue reading A star shines on the hour of our Elvish lesson: An introduction to Tolkien’s languages

The Balfour Declaration: A Past and Contemporary Public Relations Analysis

Among the more inflammatory historical comments made by British authorities lies the Balfour Declaration, a 67-word statement published in the heat of the first World War that many historians argue ignited an already well-kindled Israeli-Palestinian conflict. The Balfour Declaration reads: His Majesty’s government view with favour the establishment in Palestine of a national home for … Continue reading The Balfour Declaration: A Past and Contemporary Public Relations Analysis

“There’s men and there’s women and there’s me:” LGBTQ individual describes a life of subtle advocacy

WEST DES MOINES—Janet Belluchi isn’t afraid of truth. Death, old-age, decay, spirituality, intimacy, AIDS, love, marriage, emotion—these are the topics she addresses unflinchingly. Methodically. As she would the weather or sports. The contents of her mind are naked. Delivered in blunt, sentence fragments. Whittled with nothing but a chuckle. The only extravagance she bore was … Continue reading “There’s men and there’s women and there’s me:” LGBTQ individual describes a life of subtle advocacy

The temporally-integrated dolphin on etymology relating to newspapers

There’s a reason why the words text and textile are so similar. They both stem from sheep’s wool. Wool shows up in many places in the English language. The Latin word for tuft of wool is burra, which incidentally often covered desks, giving us words like bureau and bureaucracy.  The first printing press in England … Continue reading The temporally-integrated dolphin on etymology relating to newspapers

A non-euclidean parable

Imagine yourself in Flatland. You are a two-dimensional being confined to a surface of unknown concavity. Your interactions with other bodies in Flatland are limited to one-dimension; you see them as lines of varying length, growing bigger as they approach you, shrinking smaller as they move away. You’re an existential stick figure, one whose identity … Continue reading A non-euclidean parable