A non-euclidean parable

Imagine yourself in Flatland. You are a two-dimensional being confined to a surface of unknown concavity. Your interactions with other bodies in Flatland are limited to one-dimension; you see them as lines of varying length, growing bigger as they approach you, shrinking smaller as they move away. You’re an existential stick figure, one whose identity … Continue reading A non-euclidean parable

Echo chambers of the genius

Much of what impedes the steady flow of writing is the inhibition that my thoughts are not original enough. Indeed, creativity in and of itself does not spawn from nothing, as we tendentiously think creation to characteristically maintain. Creativity is the process of linking two or more ideas that had not previously been linked. Therefore, … Continue reading Echo chambers of the genius

Action at a distance: science fiction or fact?

It is certainly fanciful to entertain the idea of nonlocal causality. Telekinesis, telepathy, action at a distance—it’s the matter of science-fiction, really. As one obsessed with the concept of communication—how it is fourfold, according to modern understanding: comprised of source, receptor, message and medium—the possibility of trifold communication is exhilarating. Truth disseminated instantaneously and through … Continue reading Action at a distance: science fiction or fact?

The Small, the Quiet and the Dark: Unwritten conventions of the hostel dorm room

Hostels are for the small, the quiet, and the dark. This I have concluded based on many a travel-wearied night spent in these establishments. Hostels exist in diverse forms, and occupy many a nook and cranny of the world; a plush, repurposed church amidst the misty Welsh mountains. An eight-floored apartment complex with free make-your-own-pancake-breakfast … Continue reading The Small, the Quiet and the Dark: Unwritten conventions of the hostel dorm room

Reckless theories and Cubist theoreticians: an investigation into the mentality of a physicist

In a 1916 paper publishing the measurement of Planck’s constant — which has since been critiqued as dramatic for its time, and Nobel-prize-worthy, among other names — Robert A. Millikan referenced Albert Einstein’s theory on the quantization of light as “reckless.” I’ll admit that to-date in my readings of scientific papers, never have I stumbled … Continue reading Reckless theories and Cubist theoreticians: an investigation into the mentality of a physicist